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Daily Mix Tip: Are you not big on writing down notes on single flavor testers or…


Daily Mix Tip: Are you not big on writing down notes on single flavor testers or recipes you’ve mixed? Try recording a quick voice note on your phone, just be sure to title it the recipe or the single flavor that you’re testing and save it to your computer once a month. You can go back and listen to them when you need to refresh your memory. You can even use programs to transcribe your notes for you if you really wanted them in writing! For more mixing info check out Flavor Pro http://ow.ly/Edlo30cKx4g


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VON ERL. makes distribution deal with big tobacco company – Vaping360


VON ERL. makes distribution deal with big tobacco company

Austrian vaping company VON ERL. has partnered with Fontem Ventures to boost its distribution strength. Fontem is a subsidiary of Imperial Brands, which is the parent company of Imperial Tobacco, the fourth largest international tobacco company.

VON ERL. is the maker of the well-known My. VON ERL., a popular pod system, sold primarily online and through vape shops. According to the company, they’re now available in more than 3,000 outlets in 12 countries.

An alliance with Fontem will give VON ERL. the distribution power of a tobacco company, and allow their products to be seen by substantially more smokers in many more points of sale. This is likely to become a common strategy for mid- and large-sized e-cigarette companies. Vapor Beast was acquired last year by “little tobacco” company Turning Point Brands.

Fontem owns many e-cigarette patents, including Hon Lik’s original Ruyan patent.

Fontem Ventures makes Imperial’s non-tobacco nicotine products, and is best known for the Blu e-cig brand, which it acquired when Reynolds American International (RAI — better known as RJ Reynolds) bought rival Lorillard. Reynolds and Lorillard were forced to divest themselves of some brands (which also included Winston, Kool and Salem cigarettes) by the Federal Trade Commission.

One of Fontem’s purposes when the subsidiary was created was “to acquire, manage, operate, encumber and dispose of property, including patents and other intellectual property rights.” Fontem owns many e-cigarette patents, including Hon Lik’s original Ruyan patent. In fact, along with their 2013 purchase of the Hon Lik/Dragonite patents, Hon himself came to work for Fontem. He still does.

Fontem Ventures has been responsible for good science on vapor products, including funding some studies that were done by independent researchers. The company also created an astroturf advocacy site that recruited vapers through social media to contribute their stories, while hiding its origin. That site shut down quickly after being exposed as a non-grassroots effort.

The post VON ERL. makes distribution deal with big tobacco company appeared first on Vaping360.

#vaping

VON ERL. makes distribution deal with big tobacco company – Vaping360

 


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Taste Your Juice | BIG NEWS: Cole and Bishop Introduce The FDA Deeming Authority Clarification Act of 2017 & The VTA Explains it


BIG NEWS: Cole and Bishop Introduce The FDA Deeming Authority Clarification Act of 2017 & The VTA Explains it
Cole and Bishop Introduce The FDA Deeming Authority Clarification Act of 2017

“While there is disagreement about whether certain tobacco products should be regulated or not, there should be agreement that new regulations should apply to products moving forward, and not retroactively,” said Cole. “Inconsistent authority like this will be detrimental and unfair to many manufacturers and businesses. This legislation preserves the FDA’s ability to regulate these products on part with cigarettes, grandfathers currently available products and then requires the FDA’s approval before any new product is introduced.”

See the entire press release HERE.

The VTA goes on to further explain what this means:

WASHINGTON, DC – Today, the Vapor Technology Association (VTA) issued the following
statement in support of bipartisan legislation introduced by Representatives Tom Cole (ROK)
and Sanford Bishop (D-GA) that would modify the predicate date for e-cigarettes and
provide much needed regulation of vapor products as the technology that they are rather
than the tobacco products that they are not.

See the entire press release HERE.

Taste Your Juice | BIG NEWS: Cole and Bishop Introduce The FDA Deeming Authority Clarification Act of 2017 & The VTA Explains it

 


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Trump is promising big changes at the FDA — here’s how drugs are approved today


Trump is promising big changes at the FDA — here’s how drugs are approved today
Reuters

At least one of President Trump’s possible picks to head the Food and Drug Administration has a radical idea for when drugs should come to market.

Jim O’Neill, managing director at Mithril Capital, has said that he is in favor of approving drugs that are proven to be safe, even before they’re shown to be actually effective.

Regardless of who Trump picks in the end, his interest in cutting regulation at the FDA is clear.

“We’re going to be cutting regulations at a level that nobody’s ever seen before,” Trump said in a meeting with pharma executives on January 31. He estimated up to 80% of regulations will be slashed.

The FDA is responsible for regulating food and drugs. It’s also responsible for regulating medical devices, blood donations, veterinary products, cosmetics, and tobacco. Trump’s comments have left the drug industry concerned about what that deregulation could mean for the drug approval process.

As it exists right now, the FDA approval process can be a long and expensive. Here’s a look at how it works currently.

Skye Gould/Business Insider

Before a drug makes it to the FDA, the company has to show how it works in animals. Scientists run tests on different animals, and in the end bring that data to the FDA in the form of an Investigational New Drug application. If the FDA signs off, the company starts testing the drug in humans.

The FDA isn’t gathering that data or running the trials. That’s the responsibility of the drugmaker. The agency is just there to review it.

Skye Gould/Business Insider

That’s when phase one begins. During this trial, drugmakers administer the drug to a group of healthy humans who don’t have the disease. They’re just determining if the drug is safe. Researchers can see if the drug is toxic at higher levels and figure out if there are any major side effects that would become a problem in later trials.

These trials tend to be small, with roughly 20 to 80 participants, according to the FDA.

Skye Gould/Business Insider

Like phase one, the second trial tests whether a drug is safe, but this time the drug is given to people who have the disease, rather than healthy people.

This trial is “randomized.” That means half of the participants receive the drug and the other half gets a sugar pill called a placebo. And while this test is mostly about safety, having the control group helps the researchers begin to pick up clues about whether the drug is working as designed.

The groups are larger, with participants numbering in the hundreds, according to the FDA.

It is at this stage that the drug-approval process could end if the Trump administration picks a commissioner in favor of approving drugs only after they’ve been proven safe and not necessarily effective.

Based on the current clinical-trial process, there’s just a 30% chance of a drug moving from phase two to phase three, according to data from biotech trade organization BIO.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

See Also:

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6 strange things love does to your brain and body

SEE ALSO: One of the next epidemic-level chronic diseases doesn’t have any approved treatments — and it could ‘swamp the system’

DON’T MISS: Everyone wants a piece of the drug industry and it’s one reason prices are rising so fast

Trump is promising big changes at the FDA — here’s how drugs are approved today

 


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