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Australian Psychiatrists Urge Government To Lift Nicotine Ban | DIY E-Liquid Blog – E-Juice Makers


Australian Psychiatrists Urge Government To Lift Nicotine Ban
BY CHRIS MELLIDES

There’s been a shift in the debate over access to e-cigarettes containing nicotine in Australia.

Many psychiatrists operating within the country are urging the government to lift the ban on nicotine, because the mentally ill who are documented as being heavy smokers could stand to benefit from using vapor products instead of continuing to smoke cigarettes.

The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) states that the mentally ill are more likely to smoke heavily with life expectancy cut by 20 years compared to the general population, according to The Sydney Morning Herald.

It is currently legal to purchase vapor products in Australia, but it’s illegal to sell, possess or use nicotine with them.

The move by the RANZCP is the first instance of a specialist medical college or major health group to go against Australia’s medical community, which is largely in favor of banning e-cigarettes, The Herald reports.

To read more click here for The Sydney Morning Herald article.

Chris Mellides is the Managing Editor of VAPE Magazine. A seasoned journalist, he has worked in all areas of the media industry since first getting his start in newspaper reporting. Contact him at chris@vapemz.com.

#vaping

Australian Psychiatrists Urge Government To Lift Nicotine Ban – VAPE Magazine

 


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Daily Mix Tip: Want to make an authentic vaping ice cream flavor? | DIY E-Liquid Blog – E-Juice Makers


Daily Mix Tip: Want to make an authentic vaping ice cream flavor? Try adding in 0.5% up to 1% FlavourArt Polar Blast! This will give you a tasteless cold effect that will turn your ice creams into something that seems like the real deal. You can pick up FA Polar Blast at http://ow.ly/aMEW30cJpam (Wizard Labs — link shortened for analytic purposes.)


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Prepare yourself for two Ejuicemakers Mix Team One Shots debuting in the USA thi…


Prepare yourself for two Ejuicemakers Mix Team One Shots debuting in the USA this Weekend!!

#bigtings #squadgoals


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Chocolate Pirouettes

Chocolate Pirouettes

This recipe started out as an attempt to create a baked chocolate chip cookie. At first it seemed like there just wasn’t enough chocolate so I added in the milk chocolate. Once I did that the FLV milk chocolate kind of took over, and after a nearly 3 week steep it turned into one of those Chocolate…


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E-Juice Makers Mixer Profiles:Kopel:Ckemist:Jennifer Jarvis:Cl…


E-Juice Makers Mixer Profiles:

Kopel:
https://alltheflavors.com/users/HocusKrokus
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/list?filter=17677

Ckemist:
https://alltheflavors.com/users/Ckemist
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/?filter=60890

Jennifer Jarvis:
https://alltheflavors.com/users/JenniferJarvis
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/list?filter=73969

Clayton “Steamroom” Moneymaker:
https://alltheflavors.com/users/steamroom
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/list?filter=68301

Concrete River:
https://alltheflavors.com/users/ConcreteRiver

Six Strings:
https://alltheflavors.com/users/SixStrings952

ID10-T
https://alltheflavors.com/users/ID10-T

Cheeba Steeba
https://alltheflavors.com/users/CheebaSteeba
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/list?filter=35875

Sejouced
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/list?filter=25702
https://alltheflavors.com/users/Sejouced

Too Tall
https://alltheflavors.com/users/Tootall
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/list?filter=73763


E-Juice Makers Mixer Profiles:

Kopel:
https://alltheflavors.com/users/HocusKrokus
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/list?filter=17677

Ckemist:
https://alltheflavors.com/users/Ckemist
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/?filter=60890

Jennifer Jarvis:
https://alltheflavors.com/users/JenniferJarvis
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/list?filter=73969

Clayton “Steamroom” Moneymaker:
https://alltheflavors.com/users/steamroom
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/list?filter=68301

Concrete River:
https://alltheflavors.com/users/ConcreteRiver

Six Strings:
https://alltheflavors.com/users/SixStrings952

ID10-T
https://alltheflavors.com/users/ID10-T

Cheeba Steeba
https://alltheflavors.com/users/CheebaSteeba
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/list?filter=35875

Sejouced
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/list?filter=25702
https://alltheflavors.com/users/Sejouced

Too Tall
https://alltheflavors.com/users/Tootall
http://e-liquid-recipes.com/list?filter=73763


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New! MixTV – New Update for MixLife appWatch every episode of MixLife, Noted, …


New! MixTV – New Update for MixLife app

Watch every episode of MixLife, Noted, & Flavor Pro in our updated video section!

Just $1 in Apple and Android stores


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Cosmic Fog meets with FDA, prepares PMTA – Vaping360


Cosmic Fog meets with FDA, prepares PMTA

The first premarket tobacco application (PMTA) from the independent vapor industry may come from Cosmic Fog Vapors. The company announced Thursday that it has sent a briefing document to the FDA — “for the purpose of submitting Premarket Tobacco Applications (PMTAs) for their range of E-Liquid products.”

Cosmic Fog is located in Costa Mesa, CA. The company was founded in 2013, and is one of the oldest and largest premium e-liquid manufacturers in the country. They also sell their products in 60 countries around the world, including in all 28 European Union member states.

The company’s press release says Cosmic Fog’s compliance team will meet with the FDA on June 13 to discuss its “PMTA strategy, including product analysis, behavioral studies, non-clinical and clinical studies such as actual use, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies.”

The bottom line is that a company submitting a vapor product for marketing approval must prove that the product will be beneficial for the overall public health.

The company will complete its studies by June 2018, according to an e-mail from company spokesperson Christine Lawrie. She says they intend to file the application with the FDA in September 2018, though it could be postponed if the deadline is changed by the agency. The FDA has delayed some deadlines already.

According to the press release, “The Cosmic Fog regulatory team includes strategic advisors with decades of experience in navigating regulated industries such as the medical device, tobacco and pharmaceutical industries.”

Does a vapor PMTA have a chance?

The requirements for approval of a PMTA are unknown, but the FDA’s deeming regulations do list some of the tests and studies they will require. Many vaping advocates believe the specific requirements are deliberately situated beyond the ability of small companies to meet, and are designed to prevent the independent industry from pursuing approval.

The bottom line is that a company submitting a vapor product for marketing approval must prove that the product will be beneficial for the overall public health. That means that the manufacturer must analyze how its presence in the marketplace will affect smokers and vapers, but also non-smokers. They must explain how it will affect youth uptake of vapor (and cigarettes), and prove that when weighing all costs and benefits that the product will be a net positive for public health.

People call the PMTA process a “million dollar lottery” because while preparing the application may cost a fortune, there is no guarantee of approval.

“The FDA has no idea what it is doing,” wrote Dr. Michael Siegel soon after the rule was announced. “And what it is doing is completely losing its perspective.” But things have changed since Siegel wrote those words.

Many in the vapor industry are pinning their hopes on new FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb. As recently as last year, he served on the board of a vape shop franchising company. More importantly, he has indicated a belief in harm reduction — reducing use of high-risk products (like cigarettes) by making attractive, low-risk ones (like e-cigs) widely available.

Fight or flight…or compliance

There are two paths to remaining on the market after November 8, 2018. Vape manufacturers who want to stay in business have to decide whether to fight or comply. People call the PMTA process a “million dollar lottery” because while preparing the application may cost a fortune, there is no guarantee of approval.

Since even the largest independent companies don’t have millions to gamble, most will be unlikely to attempt the PMTA path. For them, putting money into advocacy strategies is the only option. But Cosmic Fog says it intends to pursue both possibilities.

“Today is a bittersweet day,” CEO Robert Crossley said in the press release. “Since the announcement of the Deeming Rule last May, we have worked tirelessly on advocating for a fair and fact based regulatory system for the vapor product category. Today, we take the responsibility of finding those facts and delivering them to the FDA ourselves. Although we will continue to support advocacy based efforts,” he continued, “we have a responsibility to our customers to ensure our products are available and on their shelves no matter what may happen in the future.”

“We will continue to support advocacy at the same level as we have in the past.”

Cosmic Fog has been known as a financial supporter of vaping advocacy causes. The company was a founding member of the Right to be Smoke-Free Coalition, which led a lawsuit against the FDA last year. (The suit was later consolidated with the Nicopure Labs suit, and is still pending. The ruling could come any day.)

That won’t change, according to Christine Lawrie. “We will continue to support advocacy at the same level as we have in the past,” the company spokesperson said in an e-mail to Vaping360. “The purpose of that statement was to let the industry know that although we have started down this regulatory pathway, we have not given up the fight.”

That’s good, because while everyone in the vaping world is wishing luck to Cosmic Fog, very few other e-liquid companies can afford to play the compliance game. Most are counting on a legislative or administrative answer. But if no one takes the chance and puts their money behind a PMTA strategy, as Cosmic Fog is about to do, we’ll never know if the possibility of FDA approval exists.

The post Cosmic Fog meets with FDA, prepares PMTA appeared first on Vaping360.

Cosmic Fog meets with FDA, prepares PMTA – Vaping360

 


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diyordievaping.com


Castle Long Reserve Remix by CKEMIST #REMIXMONTH

diyordievaping.com

 


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E-cigarettes as harmful as their analog counterparts? Not so fast


E-cigarettes as harmful as their analog counterparts? Not so fast

The e-cigarette business is booming. As smokers ditch the habit in record numbers, many look to the digital world to find a replacement for their favorite analog vice. And e-cigarettes are, for better or worse, what’s next.

With the rise in popularity comes increased scrutiny. And with the scrutiny comes a gold rush of sorts to prove these are just as dangerous as their analog counterparts. “E-cigarettes ‘Potentially as Harmful as Tobacco Cigarettes” reads the headline on UCONN’s website touting the latest of these controversial studies. But is it true?

That’s the billion dollar question for for the e-cig industry.

With heavy financial incentive it’s imperative to question everything. And with all things in journalism, the easiest way to answer a complicated question is to follow the money.

You can start with the study itself. It’s paywalled. This benefits the researchers publishing the study or, more often, the non-profits hosting it — like JSTOR. Inflammatory headlines drive traffic; it’s journalism 101. In a world where smokers are ditching the habit en masse, the easiest way to get their attention is by playing on fear and the primary motive of quitting tobacco: death. Few are going to fork over the money to read the study, and instead they’ll share the headline as fact.

That’s a mistake, and one the shady world of scientific research relies on to drive interest. In a universe revolving around research funding and accolades, it’s easy to see how shoddy science slips through the cracks. Paywall aside, these controversial studies are huge for universities even if no one ponies up to read the text.

Before diving into the findings, the study touts its “novel, automated, low-cost, dimensional (3-D) printed microfluidic array” developed to “detect DNA damage from metabolites in environmental samples.”

All good studies start with a sales pitch

Odds are the University of Connecticut (UCONN), or the researchers behind this “novel” piece of machinery plan to sell or license it at some point. It’s hard to believe UCONN’s motives are completely altruistic, but even if it doesn’t intend to profit from the machine there’s still a heavy financial incentive. There’s incentive in the attention it draws to the university, an increase in research funding from government grants and private backers, and the potential to capture young minds who’ve yet to decide which institution they’d like make loan payments to for the next decade-plus. No to mention it reads like a sales pitch.

For the University of Connecticut, it’s probably a good thing most won’t read the text, but we’ll get to that in a moment.

Staying on the financial track, there’s also a heavy incentive for lawmakers to shed doubt on digital smoking products. Big tobacco, after all, has long been one of the largest financiers of the GOP campaign trail, and even Donald Trump’s health secretary (yes, you read that right) has ties to the tobacco industry. It’s toned down its lobbying efforts in recent years, but millions found its way from tobacco farms in the Southeast directly into the pockets of Sen. Richard Burr, Rep. Paul Ryan, Rep. Kevin McCarthy, Sen. Marco Rubio, and others.

In fact, nine of the industry’s top 10 congressional recipients in 2016 were republicans.

The Vice President himself, Mike Pence, once tried to convince us that “despite the hysteria from the political class and the media, smoking doesn’t kill.” Pence, it should be noted, has pocketed more than $100,000 from the tobacco industry during his career.

Credit: Gage Skidmore / Flickr

As for the science, it’s mostly sound. Mostly.

UCONN’s study used an “artificial inhalation technique” that has been scrutinized before. In essence, a machine pulls on the device to simulate inhaling. The team set the test where 20 puffs of an e-cigarette was the rough equivalent to one tobacco cigarette — a figure in line with mosts tests.

They then gathered samples at 20, 60, and 100 puffs before determining e-cigs were just as dangerous on a DNA-level — damaging DNA and leading to cancer-causing mutations — as the real thing.

Without a proper methodology documentation, we can’t know whether these puffs were of actual liquid, or so-called dry burn. Dry burn is when the e-cig liquid is gone, and you’re instead burning the wicking device within, leading you to inhale actual smoke, not the vapor produced by the e-cig liquid. 20 puffs could easily drain a device, and UCONN makes no mention as to whether it was refilled or if the remainder of the 20 — or 60, or 100 — puffs were of the dry burn variety.

We already know inhaling the byproducts of dry combustion is cancer-causing, but that’s not typically what e-cig smokers are pulling into their lungs.

The debate on whether e-cigs are harmful is one worth having. Scientifically, though, this study contradicts nearly everything we’ve learned so far about e-cigarettes — 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 — and leading people away from a safer tobacco alternative by touting your own testing product instead of more accurate alternatives is just irresponsible.

Science aside, if you’re measuring an item with a dozen (or fewer) food-grade chemicals against one with thousands (many of which are known carcinogens), you’d be naive to believe the former could possibly be as dangerous as the latter.

You’d be equally naive to assume it was completely safe.

#vaping

E-cigarettes as harmful as their analog counterparts? Not so fast

 


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This synthetic “tongue” used to distinguish whiskies with glowing liquids could be helpful for drug safety


This synthetic “tongue” used to distinguish whiskies with glowing liquids could be helpful for drug safety

Everyone has that friend who claims they can distinguish between two drinks that, to everyone else, taste exactly the same. It’s hard to tell if they’re lying, but scientists have now created an artificial tongue that can actually do the same thing for whiskies — and this method could one day be helpful for drug safety.

It’s not just imagination: a lot of whiskies really are very similar, and the average person probably can’t tell one from another. For a study published today in the journal Chem, scientists tried to develop a way to distinguish whiskey at the chemical level. So, they created sensors that work just like the different taste receptors on a tongue, and used them to differentiate more than 30 different whiskies. This technique, unlike others, is useful because you can identify something using the original mixture, says co-author Uwe Bunz, an organic chemist at Germany’s Heidelberg University. Most of the time, you identify a mixture by separating its various parts by weight. You don’t need to do that here because you can just have the overall mixture interact with different solutions.

Our tongues have different receptors for different flavors — like sweet versus salty versus bitter. When you eat something, the molecules in the food interact with the different receptors to create the overall taste of a pickle, or Dijon mustard.

The research team’s sensors don’t look like a tongue, but they work the same way. It’s a series of tubes filled with a solution of different colors. All of them are fluorescent, meaning that they glow when you shine a blacklight on them. When you add a drop of whiskey, the chemicals in the whiskey interact with the solution to make it either more or less fluorescent.

Next, Bunz used a machine called a plate reader to measure exactly how much the whiskies changed the solution. From this, they found a unique pattern of intensities for each of the different whiskies. “You can even discriminate Irish whiskies from Scotch-blended, and single malt from double malt,” says Bunz.

The group has done the same thing with different white wines and, next up, will experiment with red wines. It’s not just about alcohol, though: in the future, this could be used to tell fake drugs apart from real ones.

#vaping

This synthetic “tongue” used to distinguish whiskies with glowing liquids could be helpful for drug safety

 


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