Posts

1499273714_81-300×169.jpg

Sweeteners | DIY E-Liquid Blog – E-Juice Makers


Sweetener?

Super Sweet not the same as TFA Sweetener
(Originally I suggested using 25% of cap ss vs tfa Sweetener in a recipe)

After learning more about super sweet I’d say don’t use it at all. And be aware that not all Sweetener is equal. Meaning using the wrong one can drastically change a recipe or even ruin it.
(Ckemist)

Jarvis and ID10-T go deeper in the comments


Source

1486151393076-1409000907149810.png

The American Heart Association Says Vaping Is Safer | DIY E-Liquid Blog – E-Juice Makers


American Heart Association got something right finally.
Get ready for the studies to pour in. Vaping Saves Lives Daily.
#bigtobacco kills.

The American Heart Association Says Vaping Is Safer Than Smoking

It’s kind of a no-brainer at this point, but health groups are moving away from blind condemnation of vaping.


Source

1499273714_81-300×169.jpg

England officially sides with vaping! | DIY E-Liquid Blog – E-Juice Makers


England officially sides with vaping!

England is the first country in the world to recommend vaping to smokers as part of its official tobacco control plan. The 32-page document was released Tuesday. It applies only to England, not the entire United Kingdom, which also includes Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

“This is probably the first significant government policy paper anywhere that recognises and pursues the opportunities of tobacco harm reduction, rather than defining these technologies as a threat to be suppressed,” wrote Clive Bates in his blog.

England has been a pioneer — the pioneer — in promoting vaping to smokers.

The plan is starkly different from American tobacco control efforts. The idea that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), or the California Department of Public Health, might actually recommend that smokers use reduced-risk products like e-cigarettes to improve their health is about as likely as Stanton Glantz tearing open a pack of Kools and lighting up at a UCSF fundraiser.

England has been a pioneer — the pioneer — in promoting vaping to smokers. It wasn’t that long ago — just two years, in fact, in 2015 — when Public Health England’s “E-cigarettes: an evidence update” shook the foundations of tobacco control, and defined the divide in public health between harm reduction and prohibition.

Vaping in the workplace? Yes, please!

Last year, PHE issued guidance to employers, reminding them, “Different approaches will be appropriate in different places, but policies should take account of the evidence and clearly distinguish vaping from smoking.”

The tobacco control plan makes that advice more official. “This recognises that decisions on vaping policy should rest with owners and managers of premises – and that the justification to override the preferences of property owners with blanket vape-free laws does not exist,” writes Clive Bates. “This is an ethically robust position to take.”

Will England dump the TPD after Brexit?

The hated Tobacco Products Directive (TPD) provoked many vapers to vote to leave the European Union last year. The tobacco control plan provides the first official hint that England could possibly abandon the TPD after the U.K. exits the E.U.

“We will look to identify where we can sensibly deregulate without harming public health or where EU regulations limit our ability to deal with tobacco,” says the Department of Health. “In particular, the government will assess recent legislation such as the Tobacco Products Directive, including as it applies to e-cigarettes, and consider where the UK’s exit provides opportunity to alter the legislative provisions to provide for improved health outcomes within the UK context.”

That would be a welcome development for vapers and vaping businesses. The disruption to the market caused by the pointless regulations of the TPD has caused some vape companies in the U.K. to close, and forced vapers to hack devices and DIY e-liquid to have workable gear.

The post England officially sides with vaping! appeared first on Vaping360.

#vaping

England officially sides with vaping! – Vaping360

 


Source

20229100_2123650187861597_8286036276397871036_n.png

Daily Mix Tip: Colored e-liquid? | DIY E-Liquid Blog – E-Juice Makers


Daily Mix Tip: Are you wondering how to get colored e-liquid? Most of the time if you ask this question in a group you are going to get a resounding NO DON’T DO IT!!! Most mixers are profoundly against putting extra ingredients that may potentially have harmful effects, the reason why most say No to food coloring. However, that is not helpful for the folks who may not be worried about safety at that level and may want to color their liquids anyway.

If you want to color your liquids, my suggestion is to stay away from artificial colors as they pose the most potential for safety risk. Nature’s Flavors does carry natural food colorings, they aren’t quite as vibrant as artificial colors, but they will color your liquids. Being natural there may be less cancer risks as those are worries with artificial colors just in eating them, imagine what they could do to your lungs! So if you want to dye your eliquids a color, Go Natural.

For more professional tips and articles visit Flavor-Pro: http://ow.ly/q6iM30dFobn




Source

ecig-e1499899864488.jpg

Exempt from FDA rules? | DIY E-Liquid Blog – E-Juice Makers


Progress?

Should e-cigarettes be exempt from FDA rules? A House panel says yes

Legislation approved Wednesday by the Republican-controlled Appropriations Committee would prevent the FDA from requiring retroactive safety reviews of e-cigarettes already on the market. But most panel Democrats said the products are dangerous and are targeted at children.


Source

New-Logofp4.png

Flavor-Pro Tips | DIY E-Liquid Blog – E-Juice Makers


Daily Mix Tip: With some flavors less is more, but with some brands less is just less. With brands not designed for vaping, like Loranns and Flavor West and even TFA and CAP, sometimes you do have to use 5% and 10% of the flavoring in order to get a full flavor from it. If you are using the more concentrated flavorings that are intended for vaping, the less is more rule often prevails. Under 3% for most of the super concentrates and even below 1% will often result in better blends. It is all about finding what works for your palate, but don’t forget the more flavoring you use the more likely you will suffer from flavor blindness to those molecules quicker (vapers tongue) so if you can taste a flavor at first and it disappears this may be the problem. For more mixing info check out Flavor Pro http://ow.ly/dHE930cKwI0

Flavor-Pro

FlavourArt’s Bilberry is a wild European style blueberry, which may not taste like what we expect a blueberry to taste like here in America….


Source

1499273714_81-300×169.jpg

Understanding Nicotine Strengths and Percentages – Vaping360


Understanding Nicotine Strengths and Percentages

Every new vaper knows the confusion. Shopping for your usual 12 mg/mL nicotine level, you don’t see the option there. Instead, the e-juice comes in either 0%, 0.3%, 0.6%, 1.2% and 1.8% nicotine. So what do you do? What’s the difference between nicotine strengths written as mg/mL and those written as percentages? How do you convert from one to the other?

Nicotine strength in mg/mL

Most of the time, e-liquid nicotine strengths are shown in mg/mL, which stands for milligrams per milliliter. This means that for every milliliter of e-liquid in the bottle, there is the specified amount of nicotine.

For a 6 mg/mL e-juice, this means every milliliter contains 6 mg of nicotine. If you need to work out the total amount of nicotine in a bottle or in a tank, just multiply the strength in mg/mL by the number of milliliters of it you have.

For example, if you fill up a 5 mL tank with 6 mg/mL e-liquid, you have 5 mL × 6 mg/mL = 30 mg of nicotine in your tank. In the same way, a 10 mL bottle of 6 mg/mL e-liquid contains 60 mg of nicotine in total.

Nicotine strengths as percentages

Nicotine strengths as percentages are very similar, but a little easier to understand. Instead of combining a mass (in mg) and a volume (in mL), percentages use the volumes of both. In simple terms, figures like 0.3% or 1.8% just tell you how much of the liquid in the bottle is nicotine.

This means that if you have some e-liquid containing 1.2% nicotine, any amount you measure out will be 1.2% nicotine and 98.8% PG, VG and flavorings.

Technically, this measurement is called “nicotine by volume,” in the same way the percentages on a bottle of liquor are “alcohol by volume” or ABV for short. “Nicotine by volume” is sometimes shortened to NBV too.

You could also work out the percentage by mass, if you wanted to, but e-liquid companies usually don’t do this. We work with e-juice in mL, so they do to.

Converting from mg/mL to percent and back

Converting from a nicotine strength in mg/mL to a percentage is really easy. Just divide the amount in mg/mL by 10. So if you have a 6 mg/mL e-juice, this is equal to a 0.6% e-juice. An 18 mg/mL e-juice is equal to a 1.8% e-juice. And if you had a high-strength nicotine base of 72 mg/mL, this would be 7.2%

The conversion couldn’t be any simpler. To convert back from percentages to mg/mL, just multiply it by 10.

More detail on combining weights and volumes

Practically, this is all you’ll need to know to switch between percentages and mg/mL values confidently. But if you’re interested in why exactly it works out like that, here’s a bit more information.

The issue is slightly complicated because values in mg/mL mix mass and volume. This convention originated in China, where the first e-cigarettes were made. It wouldn’t be a problem, but to work out a percentage, you need two volumes to use, not one volume and one mass.

To work it out for yourself, you need to know how much volume each mg of nicotine occupies in liquid form. Nicotine has a density of 1.01 grams per cubic centimeter, which means that 1,010 mg of pure nicotine takes up one milliliter. We can use this to convert mg of nicotine to mL of nicotine.

First, we need to find the total amount of nicotine we’re considering, in mg. As covered earlier, this just means multiplying the nicotine strength – say 6 mg/mL – by the size of the bottle – say 10 mL. So in this case we have 60 mg of nicotine. Using the density of nicotine, this works out to about 0.059 mL of pure nicotine.

So to work out the percentage, you divide the volume of the nicotine by the total volume of the e-liquid and then multiply the result by 100. This means that the 10 mL bottle of 6 mg/mL e-liquid has (0.59 mL / 10 mL ) × 100% = 0.59% nicotine. Since we don’t need to be this accurate, it would be listed on the bottle as 0.6%.

You won’t need to actually do this, but this explains why all you need to do to go from mg/mL to a percentage is divide by 10. Nicotine has a similar density to water, so it’s basically 1 g per mL, and this makes the math really easy.

Congratulations: You’ll never order the wrong e-juice again

If you aren’t too traumatized from the impromptu math, you can now confidently explain what mg/mL means, what the percentage values on e-liquids mean and convert between them easily. No matter where you’re ordering from, you’ll know exactly what you’re getting.

The post Understanding Nicotine Strengths and Percentages appeared first on Vaping360.

#vaping

Understanding Nicotine Strengths and Percentages – Vaping360

 


Source

1499273938_LogoWhite.jpg

Taste Your Juice | E-cigarettes do not promote cancer growth in lab tests


E-cigarettes do not promote cancer growth in lab tests

A new study found no evidence that a commercially available e-cigarette vapor promotes the development of cancer in laboratory cells. In contrast, smoke from a reference cigarette was positive for cancer-promoting activity at very low concentrations.

Read more HERE.

Taste Your Juice | E-cigarettes do not promote cancer growth in lab tests

 


Source

photodune-9802046-caramel-candies-and-caramel-sauce-xl.jpg

ButteRY4


Butterscotch RY4, super simple 4 flavor recipe — Jennifer Jarvis

ButteRY4

Super rich, butterscotch-caramel heavy tobacco with a creamy vanilla finish. Simple 4 flavor recipe, but still big on warm tobacco flavor. If you’re a fan of RY4 style vapes, this one is sweet and creamy but at the same time it has a deep rich tobacco notes throughout. FLV Tatanka has a smooth, rich…


Source

LogoWhite.jpg

Taste Your Juice | A BATTERY MOOCH POST: No longer accepting “IMR” on a battery unless correct


A BATTERY MOOCH POST: No longer accepting “IMR” on a battery unless correct

A BATTERY MOOCH POST: No longer accepting “IMR” on a battery unless correct

This has gone on long enough. These companies should know better.

I will no longer be accepting a battery with “IMR” on the wrap as being accurately labeled unless it actually uses the battery chemistry that “IMR” is used for (by the big manufacturers).

The use of “IMR” on the batteries marketed to vapers is a big problem. The chemistry for that model number prefix is one of the safest available in Li-Ion batteries. There are a lot of older online articles for vapers saying that only IMR batteries should be used for vaping. This makes batteries with “IMR” on the wrap seem to be a safe choice.

One big problem though…I don’t think we use any batteries with that chemistry anymore.

Almost all the cylindrical batteries we use are “hybrid” chemistry batteries, i.e., the batteries that are using the “INR” model number prefix (or its equivalent) by the big manufacturers.

That makes me wonder if…

1 These Chinese battery manufacturers and rewrappers just use “IMR” as a way to make us think the battery is a safe chemistry to get us to buy the battery.

2 It’s just become a generic tag that means “non-LiPo”.

3 These Chinese battery manufacturers and rewrappers don’t know the difference between the different chemistries and actually think they are selling batteries that use the same chemistry as in batteries using the “IMR” model number prefix.

Whichever might be true, all of these scenarios are completely unacceptable. Especially in this environment of increased regulations and government scrutiny.

The use of “IMR” by the Chinese battery manufacturers and rewrappers is confusing and unnecessary. There is absolutely no reason to have “IMR” on any battery unless it uses the correct matching chemistry. I will be calling out the batteries from these Chinese companies that do not use “IMR” correctly. There was no good reason to ever use it and it’s time to stop.

My test reports from now on will reflect this.

Our community deserves accurate ratings and labeling. These companies have had years to get it right. Lets speak with our wallets and see what we can do.

Examples of “IMR” being used: https://imgur.com/a/d9dgZ

Taste Your Juice | A BATTERY MOOCH POST: No longer accepting “IMR” on a battery unless correct

 


Source